Archive for January, 2016

  • Low testosterone linked to Alzheimer’s, memory loss

    Researchers have discovered that when a man has low levels of the male hormone, his risk for Alzheimer’s disease soars.

    “Having low testosterone may make you more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease,” warns John E. Morley, M.D., director of the division of geriatric medicine at Saint Louis University. “The take-home message is we should pay more attention to low testosterone, particularly in people who have memory problems or other signs of cognitive impairment.”

    In conjunction with researchers in China, Dr. Morley’s research shows that older men with low testosterone are more likely to encounter memory problems as they age.1

    “It’s a very exciting study because we’ve shown that a low level of testosterone is one of the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease,” Dr. Morley says.

    Continued below…

    Mankind’s biggest health threat has doctors baffled.
    (Save yourself with THIS)

    HEALTH ALERT!

    The biggest health threat mankind has ever faced is here! And it may
    already be lurking inside you…

    It kills 100,000 unsuspecting people every year. And it’s immune to everything modern medicine has thrown at it.

    As a medical researcher and reporter, I’ve discovered that there are
    simple, easy solutions that work where drugs do not. And not even
    doctors know about it…

    I learned it the hard way.

    Click Here and I’ll tell you how I went from a happy, healthy 48-year-old
    one minute to a man at death’s door only HOURS later.

    And how I found the remedies that could be your last best hope against
    the deadliest scourge of all time.

    Common Cancer Therapy Wrecks Testosterone Levels

    Another study, one that looked at the brain health of men being treated for prostate cancer, indicates that when men receive testosterone-lowering therapy to keep their cancer in check, they double their risk of Alzheimer’s disease.2

    These researchers, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Stanford, say their study doesn’t definitively prove that what is called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) increases the chances of Alzheimer’s, but — as they note — their findings support the other research that shows a low level of testosterone makes men more vulnerable to memory loss.

    “Based on the results of our study, an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease is a potential adverse effect of ADT, but further research is needed before considering changes to clinical practice (in the treatment of prostate cancer),” says researcher Kevin T. Nead.

    Because it’s believed that testosterone and other male hormones (collectively termed androgens) can encourage the growth of prostate cancer, the disease is often treated by dropping the androgen level in the body. Aside from increasing the risk of Alzheimer’s, the therapy can lead to diabetes, impotence, heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity and depression.

    It is estimated that today about 500,000 men are undergoing ADT.

    The researchers also found that the longer you undergo ADT, the more your risk for Alzheimer’s increases.

    How Testosterone Affects Your Neurons

    While scientists aren’t sure why reduced testosterone can increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, they believe that testosterone enables brain cells to more effectively resist the neuronal destruction that wipes out memory.

    Some studies suggest that when testosterone declines, amyloid beta, the protein clumps that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease, may increase. In addition, low testosterone may lead to brain problems when it increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes (conditions that harm brain cells).

    Unfortunately, if someone already has full-blown Alzheimer’s disease, giving them extra testosterone won’t help and might make matters worse.

    A study at the University of North Texas demonstrates that raising the testosterone of men who have Alzheimer’s makes them more prone to hallucinations, aggression and other problematic behaviors. And it doesn’t improve brain health.3

    “…once someone already has Alzheimer’s, higher levels of testosterone are related to acting-out behaviors,” says researcher James Hall.

    But if your brain is still working well, now is the time to have your testosterone checked to make sure you have enough. Later on, if your memory starts to falter, it may be too late. We publish a book called Maximum Manhood that discusses safe and natural ways to boost testosterone levels, along with many other issues affecting male sexual health.


    Best Regards,

    Lee Euler

    Publisher




    References:

    (1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21504130
    (2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26644522
    (3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25937840

  • Low Testosterone Levels Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease And
    Memory Loss in Men

    Researchers have discovered that when a man has low levels of the male hormone, his risk for Alzheimer’s disease soars.

    “Having low testosterone may make you more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease,” warns John E. Morley, M.D., director of the division of geriatric medicine at Saint Louis University. “The take-home message is we should pay more attention to low testosterone, particularly in people who have memory problems or other signs of cognitive impairment.”

    In conjunction with researchers in China, Dr. Morley’s research shows that older men with low testosterone are more likely to encounter memory problems as they age.1

    “It’s a very exciting study because we’ve shown that a low level of testosterone is one of the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease,” Dr. Morley says.

    Continued below…

    Mankind’s biggest health threat has doctors baffled.
    (Save yourself with THIS)

    HEALTH ALERT!

    The biggest health threat mankind has ever faced is here! And it may
    already be lurking inside you…

    It kills 100,000 unsuspecting people every year. And it’s immune to everything modern medicine has thrown at it.

    As a medical researcher and reporter, I’ve discovered that there are
    simple, easy solutions that work where drugs do not. And not even
    doctors know about it…

    I learned it the hard way.

    Click Here and I’ll tell you how I went from a happy, healthy 48-year-old
    one minute to a man at death’s door only HOURS later.

    And how I found the remedies that could be your last best hope against
    the deadliest scourge of all time.

    Common Cancer Therapy Wrecks Testosterone Levels

    Another study, one that looked at the brain health of men being treated for prostate cancer, indicates that when men receive testosterone-lowering therapy to keep their cancer in check, they double their risk of Alzheimer’s disease.2

    These researchers, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Stanford, say their study doesn’t definitively prove that what is called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) increases the chances of Alzheimer’s, but — as they note — their findings support the other research that shows a low level of testosterone makes men more vulnerable to memory loss.

    “Based on the results of our study, an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease is a potential adverse effect of ADT, but further research is needed before considering changes to clinical practice (in the treatment of prostate cancer),” says researcher Kevin T. Nead.

    Because it’s believed that testosterone and other male hormones (collectively termed androgens) can encourage the growth of prostate cancer, the disease is often treated by dropping the androgen level in the body. Aside from increasing the risk of Alzheimer’s, the therapy can lead to diabetes, impotence, heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity and depression.

    It is estimated that today about 500,000 men are undergoing ADT.

    The researchers also found that the longer you undergo ADT, the more your risk for Alzheimer’s increases.

    How Testosterone Affects Your Neurons

    While scientists aren’t sure why reduced testosterone can increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, they believe that testosterone enables brain cells to more effectively resist the neuronal destruction that wipes out memory.

    Some studies suggest that when testosterone declines, amyloid beta, the protein clumps that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease, may increase. In addition, low testosterone may lead to brain problems when it increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes (conditions that harm brain cells).

    Unfortunately, if someone already has full-blown Alzheimer’s disease, giving them extra testosterone won’t help and might make matters worse.

    A study at the University of North Texas demonstrates that raising the testosterone of men who have Alzheimer’s makes them more prone to hallucinations, aggression and other problematic behaviors. And it doesn’t improve brain health.3

    “…once someone already has Alzheimer’s, higher levels of testosterone are related to acting-out behaviors,” says researcher James Hall.

    But if your brain is still working well, now is the time to have your testosterone checked to make sure you have enough. Later on, if your memory starts to falter, it may be too late. We publish a book called Maximum Manhood that discusses safe and natural ways to boost testosterone levels, along with many other issues affecting male sexual health.


    Best Regards,

    Lee Euler

    Publisher




    References:

    (1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21504130
    (2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26644522
    (3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25937840
  • Eve’s forbidden fruit (it wasn’t the apple) boosts your brain

    One of your best bets for keeping your brain stronger as you age is to eat the very same forbidden fruit that Adam and Eve consumed – the one that got them tossed out of the Garden Eden.

    No, it wasn’t an apple. Keep reading. . .

    Continued below…

    A Note from Lee Euler, Editor & Publisher

    Surprised Brain Scientists Discover…
    The Scary Reason
    You’re Suddenly So Forgetful
    — and How to Reverse the Problem:

    Are your new “memory lapses” and sudden forgetfulness normal for your age? Or are these the early signs of something more serious?

    Brace yourself for a surprise, my friend…

    Brain scientists have just discovered that the majority of age-related forgetfulness has nothing to do with “age” at all!

    Instead, they are reporting an epidemic of memory loss being caused by 4 secret factors that are destroying brain cells in seniors and 20-somethings alike.

    You can stop all 4 of these brain-destroyers in their tracks — and actually reverse their progression. In this Special Report, a leading M.D. details how to stimulate the self-repair and revitalization of your brain…

    One thoroughly-documented research study concluded:

    “Their brains performed as if they were 14 YEARS YOUNGER!”

    Wouldn’t you love it if your brain functioned like that — for life? The very encouraging news is: There’s a lot you can do to keep your brain young! Take a look at the groundbreaking research which proves it.

    According to many scholars, the famous forbidden fruit in Genesis was probably the pomegranate.

    The pomegranate – and its juice – is a botanical marvel every person concerned about brain health should be consuming.

    Potent Nutrients Go to Your Head

    Tests at the University of Rhode Island show the pomegranate contains polyphenols that help defend the brain’s neurons against the malfunctions that become more common as you grow older. (Polyphenols are natural antioxidant chemicals that plants use to protect themselves from ultraviolet light and infections, and which the human body uses to boost the immune system.1 )

    Although the Rhode Island researchers found that most pomegranate polyphenols couldn’t cross the blood-brain barrier, a physiological structure that keeps many substances out of brain tissue, their tests demonstrated that the bacteria in your digestive system can interact with polyphenols to produce urolithins – chemicals that ARE able to penetrate the brain.2

    The lab tests indicated that urolithins not only offer neurons antioxidant protection, they also prevent the formation of amyloid-beta clumps of protein. As you probably know, these amyloid-beta plaques are one of the destructive features of Alzheimer’s disease.

    In other experiments, the researchers found that urolithins increased the life expectancy of lab animals who had a condition similar to Alzheimer’s disease.

    Damping Down Inflammation

    Scientists at the University of Huddersfield in England have found that pomegranates possess other substances that may limit the harmful inflammation that can afflict an aging brain.

    According to this study, pomegranate enhances brain health with a substance called punicalagin that has beneficial effects on immune cells called microglia.3

    Microglia are cells that inhabit both the brain and the spinal column. While they are responsible for protecting neurons against damage, they also help shape the brain by pruning away injured structures. (For this reason, in past issues we’ve called microglia the brain’s trash men.) But when they misbehave and are involved in excessive neuro-inflammation, they can cause more harm than good and destroy healthy neurons.

    “”..we do know that regular intake and regular consumption of pomegranate has a lot of health benefits – including prevention of neuro-inflammation related to dementia,” says researcher Olumayokun Olajide, Ph.D., a member of the Huddersfield team.

    Dr. Olajide recommends drinking 100 per cent pomegranate juice – not one of the juice blends that are often found on supermarket shelves. He says that if you consume 100 percent pomegranate juice, more than three per cent of what you drink will be punicalagin.

    Long List of Benefits

    Researchers attribute so many benefits to pomegranate, many now accept it as a superfruit:

    • Nutrients in pomegranate may help the brain resist injury. Researchers at the Washington School of Medicine in St. Louis recommend that mothers at risk of delivering premature babies drink pomegranate juice to help their babies’ brains resist the effects of low blood flow.4
    • A study at UCLA shows that seniors who have memory problems can boost their brains by drinking pomegranate juice.5
    • Research in Israel indicates that pomegranate seed oil can help protect neurons in the brains of people suffering from multiple sclerosis.6

    These research results confirm what people like the ancient Egyptians believed: Their ancient texts claim that pomegranates have almost supernatural powers of healing.

    A glass a day of pomegranate juice can give you a chance to discover the source of their enthusiasm.


    Best Regards,

    Lee Euler

    Publisher




    References:

    (1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835915/
    (2) http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00260
    (3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25066095
    (4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15774834
    (5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23970941
    (6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26648720

  • 6 foods that protect you against Alzheimer’s

    The role of diet in brain health has grown to such an extent that it even has its own name – neuro-nutrition. And no wonder: there’s strong evidence that some foods are especially good for cognitive functioning and memory.

    Here we look at six of the best. . .

    Continued below…

    Special Message from Lee Euler

    Attention Pain Sufferers:
    Are You Missing
    This Little-Known Nutrient?

    A recently discovered plant compound, first discovered by Native Americans, can quiet pain anywhere in your body, from head to toe.

    If you or a loved one suffers from daily, long-term, chronic pain – the kind of pain that’s so bad you seldom experience a day – or a night – that’s pain-free, then you need to know about this important new discovery that can change your life.

    In clinical studies, it lowered CRP (a blood test that measures your levels of inflammation) by 23 percent. It neutralizes COX-2 and IL-6 enzymes that cause inflammation.

    Click here and see how this discovery can help you take a giant step towards wiping out chronic pain and inflammation – and reduce swelling and stiffness for good.

    Keep Reading – Click Here!

    Olive Oil and Nuts: A study published in July, 2015 found that a Mediterranean diet supplemented with either 33 ounces of extra virgin olive oil or 7 ounces of a mixture of walnuts, hazelnuts and almonds per week for four years could improve memory and thinking ability in 334 men and women in their 60s.

    Dr. Emilio Ros, who led the study, said:
    “You can delay the onset of age-related mental decline with a healthy diet rich in foods with a high antioxidant power, such as extra virgin olive oil and nuts.

    “Because the average age of participants was 67 when the trial began, one can say that it is never too late to change your diet to maintain or even improve brain function.”

    Senior clinical nutritionist Samantha Heller from New York Medical Center agrees, “Healthy fats from foods like nuts and olive oil play crucial roles in brain function and health.”

    Citrus Fruit: These are high in antioxidants and contain the highest concentration of flavanones – a subclass of flavonoids. They protect brain areas concerned with perception and recognition.

    Data from the Nurses’ Health Study, which involved 69,622 participants over 14 years, found those who consumed the most citrus fruit (mainly oranges and orange juice) had a 19% reduced risk of ischemic stroke, in which blood supply to the brain is blocked.

    Victor Marchione, M.D., calls citrus fruit “the new brain food,” and urges you to “add some citrus fruits to your diet to get some brain protection.”

    Fish: A study published in 2014 showed that healthy people past the age of 65 who eat baked or broiled fish at least once a week have bigger brains. According to this article, the fish can be virtually any kind; it doesn’t have to be “oily” fish such as salmon.

    The participants had 14% more gray matter in areas associated with memory and four percent more in areas associated with cognition.

    Lead author Dr. Cyrus Raji said:

    “If you eat fish just once a week, your hippocampus—the big memory and learning center—is 14% larger than in people who don’t eat fish that frequently.

    “If you have a stronger hippocampus, your risk of Alzheimer’s is going to go down.

    “In the orbital frontal cortex, which controls executive function, it’s a solid 4%. I don’t know of any drug or supplement that’s been shown to do that.”

    Oxford University professor of physiology John Stein agrees, “Eating at least one portion of fish a week can delay the onset of Alzheimer’s by ten years.”

    Chocolate: A number of studies have shown that compounds called flavanols in chocolate can increase cerebral blood flow, protect and help neurons grow, improve memory and increase mental sharpness. They also have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

    Beatrice Golomb, Associate Professor at the University of California who has published research on chocolate, says it is “rich in plant-based phytonutrients that have a range of health effects. It has a number of important antioxidants, as well as having a lot of other neuroactive properties.”

    Dark chocolate is richer in these phytonutrients and so will offer the most benefits. Milk chocolate is merely dark chocolate diluted with other substances of little nutritional value, mainly milk and sugar.

    Berries: A rich source of antioxidants and anti-inflammatories, berries also contain compounds called anthocyanins which are another type of flavonoid. Together with flavanols, these are among the most important nutrients when it comes to brain health.

    Researchers have found anthocyanins can cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the hippocampus to improve learning and memory and stall age-related mental decline.

    Scientists at the University of Cincinnati who carried out research into blueberries said that “consistent supplementation with blueberries may offer an approach to forestall or mitigate neurodegeneration.”

    Our sister company, Green Valley Natural Solutions, offers an anthocyanin supplement called Antho-Soothe that is an extract of aronia berries, the richest source of this nutrient discovered so far. While you probably wouldn’t want to snack on aronia berries (or be able to find them in a store), their tart flavor is no problem when taken as a capsule. Click here to learn more about this source of anthocyanins.

    If you want to do even more for your cognition, also consider going all-out with the Mediterranean diet. The evidence to date is that it’s highly protective of brain health (cardiovascular health as well). As you may remember, this eating plan is rich in unsaturated fats (especially olive oil), vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, polyphenols, certain spices and red wine.


    Best Regards,

    Lee Euler

    Publisher




    References:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20308778
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25961184
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22363060
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25084680
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25344629
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25733639
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22535616

  • Love for the Three Stooges could be sign of dementia

    Although we associate dementia with memory loss, personality and behavioral changes usually take place long before cognitive failure becomes obvious. Family members of the patient may report that Mom or Pop has become more self-centered, apathetic or inflexible in the years leading up to dementia.

    The problem is, changes of this kind can be quite hard to evaluate. They may or may not have any connection with dementia.

    But now evidence points to one particular change in behavior that could be a dead giveaway dementia is on the way. . .

    Continued below…

    This MRI could save your life

    I’ve never seen anything like this…

    Experimental doctors treating a former gold medalist with terminal cancer got the shock of their lives when they held his MRI up to the light.

    What they saw could be hailed as the biggest cancer breakthrough in history.

    And after 7 years, their unbelievable discovery is finally being revealed in this free video.

    If you’re suffering from cancer or even if you just want to see something astonishing… You need to watch it now.

    The government has kept this rare footage quiet over the last 7 years for fear it will topple the billion dollar cancer industry… I can’t guarantee how long it will be available, so watch now!

    Researchers believe a person’s sense of humor could prove to be a reliable and useful early warning sign of Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

    Dr Camilla Clark and her team of researchers from University College London questioned close friends and relatives of 48 dementia patients to see if they had noticed any change in what the patients found funny in the decade before they were diagnosed. 21 healthy people of a similar age were enrolled as a comparison group.

    The study was small, but the results were fascinating. . .

    Dementia Patients Increasingly

    Amused by Slapstick Comedy

    The researchers found that humor needing some complexity in thinking such as satirical comedy — or absurdist sketches such as those of Monty Python — were less entertaining to the dementia group even if they had previously enjoyed them. The healthy control group had a much higher liking for sophisticated comedy.

    But – bad news for Three Stooges fans – the dementia patients increasingly enjoyed slapstick humor.

    Those with the most common form of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) – a type that affects people at a younger age and usually starts with behavioral changes – also laughed at inappropriate times.

    They would find humor in mundane subjects like a barking dog or a car that was badly parked. FTD patients also developed a darker form of humor, enjoying others’ misfortune, such as a child falling off a bicycle or natural disasters.

    If the FTD group told jokes, these tended to be childish, smutty or graphic. Dr. Clark comments, “These were marked changes – completely inappropriate humor well beyond the realms of even distasteful humor. For example, one man laughed when his wife badly scalded herself.”

    This sadistic sense of humor was not found in Alzheimer’s patients – and indeed, FTD patients were more likely in general to experience changes in their sense of humor. The symptom appeared in Alzheimer’s patients sometimes, but not always.

    FTD differs from Alzheimer’s disease and is marked more by personality changes than by loss of memory.

    Humor Could be a Sensitive Indicator

    The study concluded that “Humor may be a sensitive probe of social cognitive impairment in dementia.”

    Dr. Clark believes humor could be a revealing and sensitive indicator because it relies on different characteristics of the brain. She writes:

    “These findings have implications for diagnosis. Personality and behavior changes should be prompts for further investigation and clinicians themselves need to be more aware of these symptoms as a potential early sign of dementia.

    “As well as providing clues to underlying brain changes, subtle differences in what we find funny could help differentiate between the different diseases that cause dementia.”

    Dr Rob Buckle at the Medical Research Council said that dementia “is about much more than memory loss. Such insights will allow us to build up a full picture of the changes that people experience in the early stages of dementia.”


    Best Regards,

    Lee Euler

    Publisher




    References:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26444779
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